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TOPIC: Movin ya ol bags around...

Re: Movin ya ol bags around... 11 Jun 2013 10:17 #113639

  • Roderick Smith
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Here is another Queensland clip. In 1968, it wasn't taken with HCVC in mind, so the two-wheel trolley in the foreground is cropped. This photo provides a link back to the starting point of this varied thread, and I have more variety yet to come.

Another style is preserved at National Railway Museum (Port Adelaide, SA), as part of the platform landscape of a typical break-of-gauge station. It is a two-wheel wheelbarrow, apparently with springing. It appears at 1 min 40 s for about 3 s in a video made to mark the museum's 50th anniversary.


680128Su Rockhampton Qld platform trolleys. R Smith

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Re: Movin ya ol bags around... 19 Jun 2013 14:24 #113640

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Here is a freeze-frame view from the youtube video mentioned in the previous post. This trolley is at National Railway Museum, Port Adelaide (SA).
'Alco961' is one of the internet names of a prolific recorder of the SA railway scene.

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Re: Trolleys - NZ 22 Jun 2013 10:50 #113641

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Here are two styles at Taumarunui, a major division point on the Wellington - Auckland line.

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Re: Parcels sled 29 Jun 2013 10:41 #113642

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I keep finding varied trolleys while I am scanning prints for railway-research themes. Here is something different: a parcels sled. They exist in lots of snowy countries. This one was on Hokkaido (Japan). In January it was very snowy; no wonder that it is a skiing mecca for Australians.

830116Su Japan Hama-Tombetsu parcels sled. R Smith

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Re: SA trolley 04 Jul 2013 13:18 #113643

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At last, a South Australian Railways high-floor trolley, but just a bit cropped. I suspect that it has billycart wheel arrangement: fixed rear axle and pivoting front axle.

690531Sa Gladstone SA loco 526 trolley. R Smith

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Re: Movin ya ol bags around... 04 Jul 2013 15:47 #113644

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I dunno how ya do it Rodders..
Ya just keep pullin them out of the woodwork!

That particular unit looks like it may have been constructed to use on and off, hard stand?


chocs 8-)

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Re: Movin ya ol bags around... 04 Jul 2013 20:12 #113645

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Now this is a real bag trolley. LOL



Suitcases on the trolley to the hotel


Trevor

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Re: Movin ya ol bags around... 08 Jul 2013 12:28 #113646

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I have lots more clips of railway trolleys yet to post, and have made a start on airport ones. Today, just a response to the interesting Venezia (Italy) baggage boat.

I went to the website shown on the baggage-tender, and it is full of interesting information (in easy Italian, and English too) and photos. The company also runs Mercedes minibuses between the airport and the docks.
<www.trasbagagli.it>

Related to this jump in scale from hand trolleys, I am still hunting for a 1970s article on Mount Cook Airline.
It ran a DH89 Rapide as a baggage tender for its flights into tourist areas.
Since the main link from Christchurch used HS748s in this area, I suspect that the baggage run was Milford Sound. MCA inherited the Rapide and two Dominies (the military DH89) when it took over this route. I suspect that when passenger flights became Cessnas, the baggage tender was needed. See:
< 3rdlevelnz.blogspot.com.au/2011/06/last-...ilford-sound.html> ;

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Re: NZ trolleys 10 Jul 2013 11:58 #113647

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Here are some more NZ ones.
This service was an interesting one: it ran mainly to deliver newspapers and parcels to west-coast towns.
As at 1965: Christchurch 1.50; Greymouth 6.18-30; Hokitika 7.30; Ross 8.00. By 1976, I think that it didn't continue beyond Greymouth.

The Vulcans were imported from UK in the 1940s, and for years were the fastest thing on NZ rails (capable of 120 km/h, but that wasn't allowed as a service speed). One was lost at sea when its ship was torpedoed (WWII).

Vulcan-Frichs 6-cylinder engine, 185 kW, driving through a fluid coupling & 5-speed Wilson epicyclic gearbox.

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Re: Movin ya ol bags around... 24 Jul 2013 10:46 #113648

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Here is another railway one, this time WA.
In this era, there were two overnight trains from Perth on 1067 mm gauge.
Left of frame is the lower-rank one 'Kalgoorlie', conveying local & interstate passengers and parcels.
In this view, there is a roller-deck conveyor for the parcels continuing east on 'Trans Australian', on standard gauge (1435 mm). Other trolleys are collecting local parcels, and those which will continue on the connecting bus to Esperance. Later, the overnight express 'Westland' will arrive; passengers will change promptly, and continue east on a Nullarbor crossing.

I don't know if WA trolleys had their own style, or if all systems simply copied a UK one. In this crop and light, the detail is hard to judge.

The loco on the left is an XA, fitted with a Crossley engine reputedly designed for submarines. They were notorious for spewing oil everywhere, and (surprisingly) for vibration. The only other railway in the world to use the was Ireland.
The pair on the right are classed GM, fitted with the classic EMD 16-cylinder 567C engine. Because of the long desert running, the bodies were pressurised to stop dust from penetrating.

In the truck world, there are various cult makes. In the railway world, the EMD 'Bulldog' nose is a cult classic, very common in North America and Australia, and with a European variant. Now the few survivors are with preservation/heritage operators, plus a sprinkling in freight use in Victoria (the last rostered passenger run was in April), and a few in the hands of private mainline operators in NSW.
GM1 is being restored by Rail Heritage WA to be a centrepiece of the centenary celebrations of Trans Australia Railway, in 2017.

690116Th Kalgoorlie WA transhipping R Smith

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