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TOPIC: Buses converted to campervans

Buses converted to campervans 18 Mar 2019 16:30 #199465

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Found this up at Dorrigo last weekend. No one around to ask about it but it looks like a nice toy.




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Buses converted to campervans 19 Mar 2019 14:45 #199490

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On that earlier theme of trucks converted into motorhomes. This is my current little motorhome I use for work.
Used an ex IPEC box on a Ford/Mazda T series cab chassis. Great economical Mazda/Perkins bio diesel, 10 speed. I built the two piece tailgate based on a panel van, bottom forms an entry platform and the top an awning with a rollaway screen door. Note the old barn door hinge bases. No 240V, only runs solar 12V.



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Buses converted to campervans 18 Apr 2019 16:56 #200063

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I'll add the photos later.
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Meet the young Australians living on the road.
‘The best decision we made’: Young Australians living on the road Apr 2, 2019
While some of us cry into our lattes over the lack of funds to buy a home in Australia’s central cities, others take a novel approach to making their dream a reality.
Ash and Hayden started saving for a bus rather than a home, eventually finding one for sale on Facebook. “We were over our weekly routine of working nine to five and commuting so we decided that it could be fun to buy a bus or sprinter van and turn it into our little home on wheels,” says Ash.
The couple stripped the interior of the bus to redesign it for their needs. “Living in such a small space has made us realise that we do not need anywhere near as much as we previously thought,” she says. Kunu The Bus has a grass

rooftop deck, kitchen, lounge area, hammock chair, TV and bed.
Ash and Hayden rely on apps like Wiki Camps and Campermate to locate free, legal camping areas or low-cost caravan parks.
Ash and Hayden decided to save for a bus rather than a home. Photo: Supplied
The couple are living on their savings at the moment, but they intend on working when they arrive in Western Australia to top up their travel funds.
“We have found that this lifestyle is more affordable than we originally thought. Everything electrical in the bus runs off solar power. Our only expenses are petrol, phone bills, weekly shopping and accommodation when needed. At first, we were in holiday mode and would regularly treat ourselves to coffee, beer and lunches, however now that we have been on the road for longer we realise that those little splurges all add up and we are more conscious about what we are spending our money on,” says Ash.
“It’s the best decision we have made and we are loving life on the road. We plan on living in Kunu and travelling around Australia for however long it takes to explore this beautiful country of ours.”
The couple are living on their savings at present, but intend to work when they arrive in Western Australia. Photo: Supplied
Dean Evezard bought his bus in 2018 after making the decision to simplify his life.
“I had worked six to seven days a week for six years to get to where I thought I had to be in life. All I had really done was build my own personal prison: a house, a mortgage and 30 more years of working my ass off to pay it off. I

decided that I was going to give myself a year to get out, so I bought a bus.”
His bus has a kitchen, lounge room, TV, bedroom and shower but no toilet.
Dean Evezard bought his bus in 2018 after deciding to simplify his life. Photo: Supplied
“The bus came looking like your typical school bus on the inside,” he says. “I had to strip it and start from scratch. I learnt a lot from the build. It cost more than I was hoping. To get it registered, it all had to be engineered and

done according to a standard.”
“I am hoping to do this as long as possible,” he says. “I’ve only just started this journey so I’m still learning how to make this new lifestyle work.”
Dean on the roof of his bus with a friend.
Dean on the roof of his bus with a friend. Photo: Supplied
Luke and Becky committed to living in a bus for the short term, but they are keen to try another type of tiny home. Initially, the couple had been seeking a campervan to travel around Australia. Noticing buses were coming up for the

same price, they bought a bus in 2018 at a bargain price.
Having stripped and rebuilt the bus for their living needs, they’ve now been living in it for five months.
Luke and Becky with their converted bus. Photo: Supplied
“We incorporated most home comforts, like an oven, indoor seating area and a full-sized bed,” says Becky. “The only thing we’re no longer keen on is not being able to escape the heat on the hot days as we have no aircon at all and we don’t want to have to use a generator or powered campsite. If it’s a hot day we’re at the beach or a local swimming pool.”
The couple did the full rebuild themselves.
“The build, in total, cost $15,000: $3000 for the bus itself and $12,000 for the build, including all the bodywork repairs, servicing the engine, the outside paint job, water and electric systems.”
Luke and Becky did the full rebuild of their bus themselves. Photo: Supplied
Having become accustomed to life in a small space, the couple are looking forward to their next home building operation.
“After this adventure ends, we will be looking into building our own A-frame tiny home.”
Related: Couple transformed a school bus into a tiny home
Related: The rise of the grown-up gap year
Related: ‘We sold our house and bought a bus instead’
< www.domain.com.au/living/young-australia...e-on-the-road-814669 >

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Buses converted to campervans 19 May 2019 16:47 #200664

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I don't think that this was originally a bus but it is close to one and was at some time a van used by a TV or radio station for outside broadcasting. This is not a good picture of the bus so I will go searching for the better one I have somewhere. Camera dies while on the roaad and took a few towns before I could get another so pics are from phone as well. This little beauty was at Tamworth this weekend and behind it was a car trailer with this lovely mid 30s Buick Coupe in 'concourse' condition. The van park was filled with Buick's from the 1920's - 1970's. Oddly enough there was a 4 door sedan same model and colour and condition parked next to us. It was a good way to loose an hour or so perving on these beauties.


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Buses converted to campervans 29 Oct 2019 08:32 #203868

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This one is purpose built, not a conversion, and is considerably more elaborate than most.

Roderick

‘This family didn’t want to rough it’: Inside the $2 million home on wheels Sep 30, 2019
The brief from the client was simple, they wanted an apartment on wheels. Photo: SLRV
When a family of eight approached SLRV Expedition Vehicles to create the ultimate home away from home, co-owner of the business Warwick Boswerger and his team set out to create the biggest and most technically advanced build the company had ever undertaken.
SLRV are no strangers to big ideas – their business aims to create self-sufficient off-road vehicles – but this was something new for them.
The two-storey truck has a price tag of a cool $2 million, and contains a large living and dining room, bathroom, a separate bedroom for the parents and the kids get the upper level all to themselves. There’s also a pull-out option for guests.
The brief from the client was simple, they wanted an apartment on wheels. Boswerger says his customers wanted a vehicle to take them where no other type of vehicle could go.
Listen to episode seven of Somewhere Else:
“Our customers are keen on exploring the country or even the world. They want to get into places that caravans and the like can’t take them,” he says.
“This family certainly didn’t want to rough it. They wanted to be self-sufficient even in the middle of nowhere.”
The kitchen and dining area is spaciously spread out on the bottom level. Photo: SLRV
Finding the balance to create an expedition vehicle that takes you off the beaten track but also sleeps 10 people comfortably is no easy task, and the SLRV Commander 8×8 includes many features some don’t even have in their own homes.
“The owner wanted it to be like a unit. He wanted freezing cold airconditioning and warm heating both upstairs and downstairs,” says Boswerger. “There’s six kids in the family, so that means a lot of cooking and cleaning appliances, too.”
The truck is complete with a washing machine and external kitchen. Photo: SLRV
So two adults, six kids and room for an extra two people – there’s a lot that goes into keeping all of those people fed, bathed and happy.
Here’s exactly what’s included:
A fully functioning kitchen, an external kitchen, two induction cooktops, two ovens, two microwaves, a fridge and freezer, washing machine, ducted heating and aircon, sound systems and enough TVs to ensure there’s no movie arguments.
The six kids get a level all to themselves. Photo: SLRV
It’s all powered by a detailed battery system, a world-first according to Boswerger, that also allows the owners to charge up as they drive.
That means a drive through, say, a big stretch of hot, dusty central Australia will mean the aircons are ready to blast when it’s time to settle for the day. The van also has sizeable solar panel on the roof.
Boswerger says the build took six months of solid design work followed by seven months of “around the clock” build time.
The kitchen has two ovens and two cooktops – more than most houses. Photo: SLRV
“We knew this was going to be a challenge but we have never shied away from a challenge,” he says. “It was a massive development, we even had to build equipment to help us build the vehicle.”
Travelling around the country is now on the bucket lists of many Australians. Boswerger says consumers are gearing more towards a complete off-road experience, and we may be seeing an increase of vehicles such as the Commander 8×8.
“People want to take the path less travelled, they don’t want to take the usual routes along the usual roads,” he says. “They are looking for something they can live in and have unique experiences in, that’s what expedition vehicles like this one provide.”
Related: Living full-time in a camper trailer
Related: The Aussie couple travelling the world
Related: John’s underground life
< www.domain.com.au/living/inside-the-2-mi...ome-on-wheels-883290 >









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Last edit: by Roderick Smith. Reason: put spaces between the photos

Buses converted to campervans 31 Oct 2019 16:54 #203920

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here's something to be converted. an old booze bus. So the police pull you over and say "Get in the Booze Bus sir", "But officer I already am!"
booze bus click here
Hiding in the shed covered in grease and muck - want a coffee?

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Buses converted to campervans 31 Oct 2019 17:14 #203923

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Now this is really cool. GMC Aerotec Peacemaker 1949/55


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Buses converted to campervans 21 Nov 2019 12:17 #204337

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Anyone here watching the Bus Grease Monkey channel on youtube.

He (Scott) travels around the US in a 47' ex Greyhound "Silverside" converted coach working on and getting old Detroit diesel powered coaches back on the road for their owners.
Great in depth detail on repairing 2 stroke stuff you wouldn't think would run again.
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In order that the labour of centuries past may not be in vain during the centuries to come... D. Did

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Buses converted to campervans 21 Nov 2019 12:51 #204339

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I put liners in a 6V71 in a Denning once ,the liners were so loose they just fell in ,block should have been bored 10 over,but the owner couldnt even afford new wheel bearings ,talk about a fleet of deathtraps.......and drivers who didnt even have truck licences.,let alone bus authorizations.......Everything I did was pay in advance,and when Id go into the office he d announce to the drivers........"I paid this b***stard all the money I had for wages ,so no one is paid this week."..Scumbag.
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Minivans converted to campervans 10 Dec 2019 15:38 #204867

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Roderick

Limited only by the size of your map: The best van conversions on Instagram Nov 4, 2019
Ivan, the quirky camper, converted by Leanne and Dan Edwards to be your home-away-from-home on the road. Photo: Quirky Campers
In the 1990s, I had a pal who lived in a van to avoid London’s crushing rents.
Gary had it all set up: a little kitchenette and a mattress set up on top of his storage space. It seemed like a weird choice then, but nowadays #vanlife is so popular it’s got its own hashtag on Instagram with more than six million posts, and according to The Times is fast becoming many Brits’ answer to owning a holiday home.
It’s a popular choice here too – Australian van-life advocate Marcel Popp and his Czech partner, Vendula Zakova traded in four walls for four wheels and life on the road following the sun around the country; Jo Jarden’s life was changed for the better by selling up and buying a $10,000 van.
There’s something incredibly charming about the van-life: Vanlifers have pared back everything to the barest of essentials – a little storage, a little warmth and a place to lay your head.
All in the service of freedom and that view, of course: ever changing and only limited by the size of your map. So here is some of the best van inspo on Instagram right now:
* NATALIE THE NUDIE. Australians Natalie, Zach, Tallow and the “little bus baby” who’s on the way live full-time in a converted tiny home on wheels that they created themselves.
Laid-back, easygoing and willing to share every aspect of their lives on the road in Australia, this hippy-tastic family want to inspire others to live out their wildest dreams. Check out their YouTube channel if you really want to get the road-life itch.
* QUIRKY CAMPERS NZ. Quirky Campers have just set up shop in NZ. They currently have three vans to rent, including owner Leanne Edwards’ van “Ivan” which she created with her husband Dan.
It’s not overstating it to say Ivan is #Vanlife #goals. With clever space-saving tricks, a Roaring Meg log burner, and a gorgeous gas-hobbed kitchen, this van is the ultimate dream home for life on the road. And the best part is, you can rent him if you want to see what all the van-life fuss is about.
* BRAD IN THE VAN and PROJECT EASY LIFE. Want a thorough guide on living the easy life? Follow Brad James, who together with his partner Sarah Jane Lowe and their (seriously cute) dog Buddy are clearly living it.
James built out his van with help from his dad: “It took us 11 days from start to finish, but there are always little improvements being made here and there.”
* FROM RUST TO ROAD TRIP. Lucy and Ben are on an adventure. Tooling around Europe and hitting all the most picturesque spots in their converted Bedford van, made entirely from reclaimed materials, the British couple are visiting 12 countries, travelling a whopping 40,000 kms from the coasts of the UK to the Swiss Alps.
We get to go with them via their beautiful Instagram as they commune with nature, wildlife, farm life and the open road. It’s a natural, life affirming journey I heartily recommend checking out.
* SALTY VAN VENTURES. Outdoors-enthusiasts Marcel Popp and his partner Vendula Zakova are huge van life advocates. Popp converted his van as a way to escape the rental grind and see as much of his adopted homeland, New Zealand, as he could and chase the summer. Their insulated van is now up for rent, so you can get a taste of life on the road. They haven’t completely traded four wheels for four walls though. According to their ‘Gram, they still throw a mattress in the back of a van for a roadie or two.
Related: Living full time in a camper-trailer
Related: Demand grows for refurbished buses
Related: When van life doesn’t work out
< www.domain.com.au/living/vanlife-the-bes...-on-instagram-901518 >









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