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A was for Austin, but now B is for Bedford 04 Sep 2021 10:02 #225373

  • 600Dodge
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If you use sika 252 you want to hope you never want to get them off, Ive used that for panelling caravans, putting floors in fridge vans, even de windowed a Holden panelvan with it(quicker and easier than welding and no distortion) I reckon I'll go that way when I refloor my tray with aluminium instead of using rivets.

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A was for Austin, but now B is for Bedford 04 Sep 2021 11:22 #225376

  • 180wannabe
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An uncle of mine uses a product called Soudal T-Rex. I am not sure which one of their adhesive range he uses, but he has recommended it to me ready for when i clad the ute canopy i am building.

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A was for Austin, but now B is for Bedford 04 Sep 2021 11:47 #225379

  • V8Ian
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With so much confidence being shown I might just rely on the contact adhesive plus the tek screws where they can be hidden.

BUT if any of my panels fly off you will definitely hear about it . . . :blink:

PDU, hearing about it is fine, hearing it, not so. :ohmy: ;)

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A was for Austin, but now B is for Bedford 04 Sep 2021 18:50 #225390

  • asw120
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PDU, as Lang said, if that stuff is yellow and smells like paint thinner, it will be pretty much useless for what you want. Good for sticking on door rubbers and headlinings.

Jarrod.

“I offer my opponents a bargain: if they will stop telling lies about us, I will stop telling the truth about them”

― Adlai E. Stevenson II

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A was for Austin, but now B is for Bedford 04 Sep 2021 19:05 #225392

  • PDU
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Top tip Jarrod, I've used that stuff when I replaced a headlining previously, went out and opened the can where it has been sitting since I bought it - and it looks very similar. :oops:

Must go looking for some Sika 252 - is that the black stuff you're talking about Swishy? I've checked Lang's link and application might be an issue. Manual application comments??? :unsure:

Thanks everyone.

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A was for Austin, but now B is for Bedford 03 Nov 2021 01:07 #227529

  • PDU
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Just a quick note to let you know I am still alive!?

After many diversions elsewhere, and minor health problems for Ernie my welder mate, things are happening again . . . albeit continuing with the welding around those never ending rear wheel arches.

Although not shown in the following photos I have the sheet metal sorted for the rear of the lower half, just not fitted at the moment because of the welding activities. Also, sheet metal in hand for the front lower section, but provision needed for curved front corner and somewhat complicated portion at the rear of the cab.


Support pieces for the curved upper/side section of the turret are ready to attempt curving sheet metal over them, which is in itself a bit of a stumbling block, but I'm certain I'll sort it out somehow.

Once I have the lower sheeting in place I'll move it outside for a clearer shot overall
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A was for Austin, but now B is for Bedford 03 Nov 2021 16:47 #227540

  • cobbadog
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If the metal for the curve is light enough you should be able to use some lengths of timber or angle iron and G clamp it in place then start pulling down on it and slowly working your way along it. Again if possible some nice pipe clamps would be handy to help with holding it in place as you shape it.
Try some more angle iron or timber and practise you old trucking knots and use a number of the half hitch set ups and again slowly pull it around. Not sure how you intend to fix it to the frame, welds or rivets but something that will aid the metal to hold its shape with in reason is a few light taps with a planning hammer as it rolls over the frame. These might be the worse ideas you have heard of but it is a start.
Ideally make a template of the curve and take the sheets to an engineering shop with a set of rollers. It would be a very quick and easy job so not too much on the hourly rate.
Cheers Cobba & Cobbarette
Coopernook, The Centre of our Universe.
STUBBOURN B@ST@RD

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A was for Austin, but now B is for Bedford 03 Nov 2021 18:16 #227545

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If you can find a pipe of slightly smaller diameter you could try rolling it around that.  An old favourite is using an Oxy bottle.

The problem with just pulling it around the frame you have is it will dent where the supports are.

Not an easy task.
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A was for Austin, but now B is for Bedford 03 Nov 2021 20:07 #227554

  • Mrsmackpaul
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There is a Russian fella on the Mack truck forum that rebuilt a sleeper, actually think he started again from scratch 
Anyway thru some smart thinking he used ratchet straps and a bend on each end of the tin end up with a rivit free smooth as a babies bum finish 

If you give me some time I'll find the thread and send a link to you 

Paul 
Your better to die trying than live on your knees begging
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A was for Austin, but now B is for Bedford 03 Nov 2021 22:16 #227561

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The metal is 0.5 zincalume, the tray is approximately 3.8 metres long and the largest sheet metal I can find is 2.4 x 1.2 metres - necessitating two sheets along the length. The lower section is made up of two strips (each made up of a rear and front section):- one from the bottom to about 6cm above the top of the guard, and the other up to the step section and overlapping the lower strip by about 5cm. This could have been done with two full height pieces with one overlap at the "halfway" mark, but would have been unwieldy to manoeuvre by myself. Also possible damage to the lower sections will be simpler with the narrower strips. The reason I haven't gone too far with the turret at this stage is because I need to work from the back to the front, and then up one level, after which I will have to do some finishing work on the step section directly below the turret. 
i.e. The turret can wait until I get to it.
cobbadog: I've experimented with clamps and pulling it around the curve, adding the extra support pieces to eliminate the tendency it had (without them) to fold rather than curve with moderate success. I have not found anybody with long enough rollers to form the curves for me, and even looked at using sections of large half round guttering - but ridiculously cost prohibitive. As for the knots, unnecessary from what I've seen so far. I should have minimal problem dragging it around the curve once the lower section is tekd along the lower edge and up the uprights. then around the curved frame work to be cut to suit the edge of the lift up roof hole. All the visible teks will be replaced by blind rivets when done.
Zuffen: I've attempted this with varying sections of pipe (oxy bottles are about the right diameter, good thinking) but very hard trying to control a 2.4 metre length of sheet metal and a large diameter piece of pipe at the same time. If I had persisted I would have crimped and damaged more metal than I can really afford! "Not an easy task." sums it up nicely; my recommendation to others contemplating anything like this is to build a tray top and enjoy it much sooner!?
Mrsmackpaul: Ratchet straps seem like a good idea and controllable too. Not fussed about the rivet free look, many early tanks and boilers had rivets in them. If you could locate the link it would be appreciated. 

If all else fails I might opt for aluminium sheeting up on the turret instead . . . easier to bend???  Whatever, knowing me though I'll probably make a corflute mock-up first, just because that will be an easy way to see how the top will look when done. 

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