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Automatic emergency braking 19 Mar 2020 13:46 #207585

  • Roderick Smith
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This is written from a private motor vehicle perspective. If implemented, it could well go across everthing.

Roderick

Emergency brakes 'would save pedestrian lives' February 4, 2020. 46 comments
Delays making autonomous emergency braking (AEB) systems compulsory in new Australian cars are costing lives and causing injuries, particularly among vulnerable pedestrians and cyclists.
"Every new one (car fitted with AEB) is one less fatality or serious injury," said Lauchlan McIntosh, the chair of the international non-profit Towards Zero Foundation and the former president of the Australasian College of Road Safety.
Experts say autonomous emergency braking systems reduce the chance that a pedestrian or cyclist will be killed or injured. ANCAP has been conducting tests. Credit:ANCAP
Nobody knows for sure whether advanced braking systems would have saved the four children who died on Saturday night in Oatlands when an allegedly drunk driver crashed into them.
Worldwide, though, they have been proven to save lives. The European Union has announced they will be mandatory in cars along with other new safety technology by 2022.
There are a range of different systems, including some able to detect and avoid crashes with pedestrians and/or cyclists.
In a submission lodged last Friday to the Joint Select Committee on Road Safety, which is investigating Australia's road accident rates, trauma and deaths, the Australian New Car Assessment Program (ANCAP) argues vehicle safety technology such as AEB will play a significant role in reducing injuries and fatalities.
According to the non-profit ANCAP, international crash data showed cars fitted with AEB were 35 per cent less likely to collide with the car in front of them. They also reduced the severity of a rear-end crash by 53 per cent.
There was "no doubt that technology was the silver bullet in road safety", said Harold Scruby, the head of the Pedestrian Council of Australia. Technology could, however, distract from more immediate changes, such as a move to a zero blood-alcohol limit that may prevent more pedestrian deaths.
Half of about 18 million registered vehicles were at least 10 years old and it would be "a very, very long time" before AEB made a big difference, he said.
Australia has signed a draft United Nations regulation to make AEBs mandatory, but road safety experts have been frustrated by delays.
A spokesperson for the Department of Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development and Communications confirmed it was undertaking early consultation on Autonomous Emergency Braking for new light and passenger and commercial vehicles.
ANCAP's chief executive James Goodwin said there was "no reason to delay the introduction of the regulation to make the technology mandatory".
“It is important to acknowledge that today’s systems are there to assist the driver, not replace the driver," he said.
About 58 per cent of new vehicles now had AEB and they were becoming more sophisticated.
Andrew van den Berg, manager of the vehicle test laboratory at the Centre for Automotive Safety Research at the University of Adelaide, has been driving a range of vehicles fitted with such systems to see what happens when they detect "dummy" pedestrians and cyclists, and even a fake kangaroo at 50 km/h.
"When you are doing it in a test situation, you know you are going to hit. You know you are too close, then the car will give you a warning, sometimes beep or [there will be] a shudder of the steering wheel," he said. "If you don't hit the brakes, the car will still brake heavily to avoid an accident."
The vehicle didn't stop in time in every case. But Mr van den Berg did avoid hitting a "dummy" child and collided with a pedestrian dummy at a lower speed than he would have otherwise.
Related Article To reduce fatalities, emissions and make Oslo more livable, the city has reduced speed limits in residential and pedestrian precincts. Oslo cut road deaths to one in 2019. Can Sydney do the same?
Related Article Sienna, Angelina and Antony Abdallah died in the collision on Saturday night. 'They were just walking on the footpath': Four children killed, one critical in Sydney crash
< www.brisbanetimes.com.au/national/emerge...20200204-p53xr4.html >

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Automatic emergency braking 19 Mar 2020 21:49 #207597

  • grandad
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Think they have been dreaming about this for a long time.
Here's a pic from 1960 of one idea, although maybe a train ticket would have been a lot cheaper if they wanted to relax on their journey?

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Automatic emergency braking 19 Mar 2020 23:32 #207600

  • JOHN.K.
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Havent cars had something like this for years?.....all these things just make drivers more careless ,and when not working serious crashes are a certainty.

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Automatic emergency braking 19 Mar 2020 23:57 #207601

  • overnite
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Isn’t that what should happen to cyclists on the road.

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Automatic emergency braking 20 Mar 2020 08:56 #207603

  • Zuffen
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I have this on my current Mercedes SUV and it beeps if you are withing the crash zone of any object.

It can't distinguish between a car or tree or a car turning left that you have judged will be clear of your path before you get there.

It will apply some very serious braking if you get too close.

If you swap from throttle to brake pedal fast enough the car senses and emergency stop and applies full brake pressure until you lift off the brakes. once you lift off the brakes remain on for a second as research shows we get off the pedal right before impact so by keeping the brakes on it reduces impact speed and may just save a life. I've found in really spirited driving or on a track it can be a nuisance.

I agree all these new fangled safety features make some drivers worse, particularly those that drive to get from point A to B and not those that enjoy and take pride in their driving.

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Automatic emergency braking 20 Mar 2020 08:56 #207604

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I have this on my current Mercedes SUV and it beeps if you are withing the crash zone of any object.

It can't distinguish between a car or tree or a car turning left that you have judged will be clear of your path before you get there.

It will apply some very serious braking if you get too close.

If you swap from throttle to brake pedal fast enough the car senses and emergency stop and applies full brake pressure until you lift off the brakes. once you lift off the brakes remain on for a second as research shows we get off the pedal right before impact so by keeping the brakes on it reduces impact speed and may just save a life. I've found in really spirited driving or on a track it can be a nuisance.

I agree all these new fangled safety features make some drivers worse, particularly those that drive to get from point A to B and not those that enjoy and take pride in their driving.

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Automatic emergency braking 20 Mar 2020 09:32 #207605

  • JOHN.K.
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Anyone here drives a truck in peakhour traffic knows 100% of car drivers are playing with screens and using the collision avoidance to stop the car before it bumps into the one in front...Zero attention to driving ,and knowing there is no chance of a copper spotting them using phones,tablets,etc.......Does anyone think an idiot who walks around with a phone in front of their eyes is going to do any different driving?
The following user(s) said Thank You: Morris

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Automatic emergency braking 20 Mar 2020 10:40 #207606

  • Morris
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The two main problems I see with driving now are:-

1. A sense of entitlement. People think they have a god-given right to drive what they want, where they want and when they want. They do not care if their vehicle is unroadworthy to the point of being dangerous and will not let the cancellation of their licence or their vehicle being unregistered vehicle stop them driving.

2. Vehicles have been made far too easy to drive. Police have caught children as young as nine years old driving stolen cars. Automatic transmissions make it so easy to drive. In the days before automatics, it took quite a lot of practice to manage a gearlever and clutch. In manuals, we were taught to use our left foot on the clutch and brake and the right foot on the accelerator. These days, we use the right foot for everything, which is why so many elderly drivers mistake the accelerator for the brake and crash into shop fronts, pedestrians, and all sorts of things.
Drivers do not have to concentrate, they sit there in their lounge chair, with the airconditioning going, their music playing on the radio or any one of a dozen different devices, their foot on the accelerator (or worse, the car on cruise control) and their mind soon wanders. No wonder they start using their mobile phone to make and receive calls or read and write text messages.

A couple of examples:-
A driver said she was "just minding her own business" when suddenly she smashed into another car at an intersection.
Years ago, a woman driver turned sharp left, crashed though a fence and down six metres (20 feet) onto a railway line. She complained that an oncoming driver had "dipped his lights at her"

In case you are wondering, yes, I do listen to the radio and use cruise control when safe and I do get bored on long drives.

I wonder who will fit automatic emergency braking to my 1926 Morris and my 1929 Chev.?
I have my shoulder to the wheel,
my nose to the grindstone,
I've put my best foot forward,
I've put my back into it,
I'm gritting my teeth,

Now I find I can't do any work in this position!

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Automatic emergency braking 20 Mar 2020 11:49 #207607

  • Blackduck59
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Be nice if pedestrians and cyclists actually took a little responsibility in this as well. Great how they always put the onus on vehicle drivers.
Ban phone use while crossing roads.
At least one cyclist here in the West was pinged for using a phone while riding and no helmet.

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Automatic emergency braking 20 Mar 2020 22:30 #207622

  • eerfree
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Yesterday I spotted a CHILD driving in school uniform proudly displaying a L plate whilst using a hand held phone with Mum sitting alongside with a huge grin on her face,
We are Doomed!!!
Bob,
I do not know how I got over the hill without ever getting to the top.

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