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Frauline Friday 23 Jan 2022 10:42 #231024

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From WIKI

Henry Ford had an inline-five engine developed in the late 1930s to early 1940s for a compact economy car design, which never saw production due to lack of demand for small cars in the United States.[1] Lancia of Italy developed a 5-cylinder diesel engine in the late 1930s for use in their RO truck series to replace the earlier 2-cylinder diesel and 3-cylinder petrol engines used. The subsequent model became known as the 3RO and was used by both Italian and German armed forces during WW2. This truck remained in production until 1950.[2][3]

Modern Diesel
The first production inline-five engine for a passenger vehicle was the Mercedes-Benz OM617, a 3.0 L diesel engine introduced in 1974 and used in the Mercedes-Benz 300D, considered to be one of the most reliable engines ever produced, often exceeding 400,000 miles without being rebuilt. It was first turbocharged in 1978. Its successor, the OM602, used in the Mercedes-Benz W124, G-Klasse and Sprinter is also known for exceeding 500,000 miles in some cases. The 5-cylinder OM602 was succeeded by the four-valve engine OM605 (E250D 20V) and later the OM612 and OM647 with turbocharger and common rail direct injection (C/E/ML 270CDI). Mercedes-Benz continued to use 5-cylinder diesel engines until 2006, when the OM612 and OM647 engines ended production, however SsangYong Motor Company continues to use them in their SUVs.

Audi produced a number of five-cylinder diesel engines for the Audi 100 and Audi A6 from 1978 to 1997. This engine is used in several Volvos and Volkswagen vans.

Volvo designed their own D5 engine which has been available in most of their vehicle line since 2001. In 2015 however it was dropped in favour of smaller, 4-cylinder engines, which replaced most of the D5 engines. Currently, there are no other Volvo 5 cylinder Diesel engines being made. [14]

The Jeep Grand Cherokee was available with inline-five diesels in Europe. From 1999 till 2001 with a 3.1l VM Motori engine and from 2002 till 2004 with a 2.7 liter Mercedes-Benz engine.

In the late 1990s, Rover Group developed an in-house inline-five diesel engine, the Td5, for the Land Rover Discovery and Defender.

Since 2006, Ford has produced a turbocharged 3.2 L five-cylinder engine under the Duratorq name for the Ford Transit, Ford Ranger, and Mazda BT-50. The same engine will be sold in the North American Transit under the Power Stroke name.

Fiat produced a turbocharged 2.4 L inline-five diesel engine in the 90's. This engine was used in the Fiat Marea, Lancia Kappa, Lancia Lybra, Lancia Thesis, Alfa Romeo 156, Alfa Romeo 166 and Alfa Romeo 159.
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Frauline Friday 23 Jan 2022 21:21 #231047

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Let's not forget that Gardner built 5 cylinder diesels in the 30's.

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Frauline Friday 23 Jan 2022 21:32 #231048

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The Dragline We've been discussing Here
www.hcvc.com.au/forum/oldjunk/20158-bucy...-class-iii-drageline

Built in 1935 has a 5 Cylinder Motor..
"Be who you are and say what you feel...
Because those that matter...
don't mind...
And those that mind....
don't matter." -
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Frauline Friday 23 Jan 2022 22:52 #231051

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Reckon I read somewhere that the straight 5 cylinder engines ran smoother than the 4's, and didn't suffer the torsional effects of an inline six.
Not too sure about this as you would think that the inline six having a firing sequence every 60 degrees of the crankshaft, would be about as even as you would get.
5 cylinders gets you a firing stroke every 72 degrees.
Dave_64

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Frauline Friday 23 Jan 2022 23:47 #231053

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5 cylinders are more smooth because the crank journals are more evenly spaced around 360 degrees. 5 as against 3. Don’t worry about the firing sequence, just the journal spacing.
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Frauline Friday 24 Jan 2022 11:58 #231058

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Getting away from Fraulines aren’t we, have spent time behind 3 cylinder Fiat tractors, had a bit to do with 3 cylinder Deutz and listened to a couple of RD6 Caterpillars. All very smooth running motors.
David.

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Frauline Friday 24 Jan 2022 12:57 #231060

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Yes, sometimes we do tend to wander a bit off original topic(s), but most times it is informative and we all possibly learn, or are made aware of interesting side issues.
Dave_64

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Frauline Friday 24 Jan 2022 13:13 #231062

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In a nutshell,that is the problem of Australia......there is too much different stuff here.

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Frauline Friday 24 Jan 2022 18:13 #231069

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Reckon I read somewhere that the straight 5 cylinder engines ran smoother than the 4's, and didn't suffer the torsional effects of an inline six.
Not too sure about this as you would think that the inline six having a firing sequence every 60 degrees of the crankshaft, would be about as even as you would get.
5 cylinders gets you a firing stroke every 72 degrees.
Dave_64


Dave, I think a four stroke 6 cylinder fires avery 120 degrees, but a GM 6/71 would be every 60. My V12 4 stroke fires every 60 degrees, very smooth.

Paul
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Frauline Friday 24 Jan 2022 19:51 #231070

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I stand corrected.
Confusing 4 strokes with 2 strokes at firing degrees!

So that would make the 5 cylinder 4 stroke fire every
144 degrees?
720/5 = 144?

Another one I had trouble with was the V6 ' odd firing' Buick engine, as used in early CJJeeps.
Dave_64

BTW, what is the V12 four stroke engine you spoke of?

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