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Some classic heavy haulage 12 Apr 2022 06:04 #234126

  • Mrsmackpaul
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Pretty sure we had a thread along these lines going once

A ship the size of the Titanic needed some serious stopping gear!
The anchor commissioned for the vessel weighed a whopping 16 tonnes, and was forged at Noah Hingley & Sons ironworks in Netherton, in England’s Midlands. In order to get the anchor to the Titanic, it needed to be transported from the Netherton ironworks to Dudley Railway Station, where it was taken by train to Lancashire before being loaded on a cargo steamer for the voyage to the Titanic‘s shipyard in Belfast, Northern Ireland. All well and good for the train and the boat; but how could the anchor reach the train in the first place?
The answer came in the form of twenty Shire horses, each capable of pulling about two tonnes. On the 30th of April, 1911, the town trams were stopped and the townsfolk lined the roads to watch the horses haul the anchor 3.2km to the goods yard at Dudley Railway Station.





Paul
Your better to die trying than live on your knees begging
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Some classic heavy haulage 12 Apr 2022 07:45 #234128

  • Bluey60
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All that effort and it never would of been used
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Some classic heavy haulage 12 Apr 2022 08:10 #234129

  • Morris
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The second photo shows it going down hill. I trust they had good "anchors" on that wagon or it would have overrun the horses.
I have my shoulder to the wheel,
my nose to the grindstone,
I've put my best foot forward,
I've put my back into it,
I'm gritting my teeth,

Now I find I can't do any work in this position!
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Some classic heavy haulage 12 Apr 2022 16:20 #234136

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Brilliant photos. No one ever thought to take a photo of our old farm house being transported by bullock train from farm to this block. This all happened many many years ago.
Cheers Cobba & Cobbarette
Coopernook, The Centre of our Universe
Working on more play time.

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Some classic heavy haulage 13 Apr 2022 08:34 #234169

  • Brocky45
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Morris my thoughts exactly.. How would they stop it???????

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Some classic heavy haulage 13 Apr 2022 10:17 #234170

  • Bluey60
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If you look at the top photo on the back of the wagon there’s a beam that looks like it’s got brake blocks on the ends and two handles further in looks like they are on rods maybe threaded??

Bluey
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Some classic heavy haulage 13 Apr 2022 12:02 #234172

  • hayseed
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I'm with Bluey... I reckon the Bloke at the Back RHS is the Brakeman........!
"Be who you are and say what you feel...
Because those that matter...
don't mind...
And those that mind....
don't matter." -

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Some classic heavy haulage 13 Apr 2022 12:18 #234173

  • PDU
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On the old bullock drays they used to throw a log into one of the wheels to lock it up when confronted by a steep hill. This was preferable to having the team dragged backwards down the hill - losing both team and load. Likewise the log was used going down also, to prevent the team being over-run by the dray.

Poor old bullocks, would have made the hills hard work for them, up or down! :oops:

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Some classic heavy haulage 13 Apr 2022 12:45 #234174

  • Dave_64
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Fair old effort, for the motive power available.
But what about the forging of the anchor itself?
Dont know much about the forging process, but am thinking that maybe used some sort of drop-hammer arrangement on a billet of steel, kept working it until they get the shape they want?
Although a huge ship for it's day, makes you wonder at the size of some of the wartime naval vessels anchors, although often see where they used two at rthe front as well as two at the back
Dave_64

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Some classic heavy haulage 13 Apr 2022 13:05 #234175

  • wee-allis
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I know it's getting away from the topic, but I am led to believe that now days, its not the size or shape of the anchor that stops a ship from drifting, it's the weight of the chain laying on the sea floor. That's why they lay out so many more metres of chain than the depth of the water they are moored in.
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