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TOPIC: JXB HERCULES

JXB HERCULES 18 Nov 2019 20:58 #204260

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Im currently restoring a 1935 Indiana with a jxb Hercules engine. I was hoping someone would know the correct size fan belt. I think it is a c section but no one stocks them that short so it would be a special order and if I get it wrong I get to keep it. Also I have attached some photo's of the headlights and I am hoping somone will know how they fit together. Thanks in advance.
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Last edit: by Sarge :-X.

JXB HERCULES 18 Nov 2019 21:03 #204261

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JXB HERCULES 18 Nov 2019 21:40 #204267

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Cannot help directly, do you have a measurement on the groove width at the top?
Do you have any old Vee belts? Any size. If so cut one and wrap it around and get a length.
If you run a tape around it take off 2-3"and you will have a C section length.
Cheers Steve.

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JXB HERCULES 18 Nov 2019 21:45 #204268

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Not sure where you are but in Rural districts the local tyre stores carry A, B & C section belts as a stock item. Best way to work out the length is to tie a length of sash cord around all the pulleys and tie it or mar it to length. Use a small piece of sheet metal and crimp it around the rope so that it is at your m,arks. Take this to the tyre store and they have a belt gauge that measures the length and then they either get one off the hook up on the rafters or order it in for you.
I used to do this for the farmers who came in with all sorts of variants of measurements. To make sure the size belt A, B, or C measure the width of the pulley where the belt sits, this will give them the size belt you need.
Cheers Cobba & Cobbarette

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Last edit: by cobbadog.

JXB HERCULES 18 Nov 2019 21:54 #204270

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Any power transmission supply place (not car parts places) should be able to provide you with the correct cross section and length.

Failing that, there are numerous styles of these available on Ebay. they are not just for machinery applications and are rated as strong as or superior to continuous belts. I had them on a pile-driving winch GM engine for 4 years and never gave a problem. They are also great in applications where you have to dismantle the whole vehicle to get a continuous belt onto the pulleys. I have carried and used them for 30 years when going off-road - you can rescue any vehicle by just adjusting the length.
www.ebay.com.au/itm/Power-Twist-Drive-T-...DUHfw&frcectupt=true

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JXB HERCULES 18 Nov 2019 22:08 #204271

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Im pretty sure its a c section about 37 inches long> I have tried all the usual places (bearing stores, Hardware, engineering places, but no one stocks them that short). Measuring accurately is not an exact science, I thought someone would have a parts book for these engines

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JXB HERCULES 19 Nov 2019 08:17 #204277

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The headlights are pretty standard for the era.

The reflector goes in (having fed the plug in from the back and fitted the globe). There is usually an earth wire from the plug to a screw inside the outer body that rusts and causes problems. Better to run the earth out the hole with the high/low wires and attach to a proper earth on the mudguard or body. It is much better to get rid of that plug in the case and run the wires through the hole, it is just one more bad connection point and nobody can see it.

If you want that plug system Milspares in Brisbane carry them for the WW2 army jeep.

With those old separate lights the whole inner unit is screwed in solid and the complete headlight is moved on the big bolt through the guard to aim the lights.

You don't have this but if it was a bit advanced and the headlights are in a fixed position the reflector is held and adjusted by usually 3 small screws. A couple will have little coil springs on them to allow movement.

The glass just sits there with cut-outs around the screws to make sure it is up the right way. The whole show is held in by the outer dress ring with usually a tag in a slot on top or bottom and a screw opposite to pull it in. Some had a gasket between the reflector and/or dress ring and the glass but most have been lost with time and just have the ring screwed in sufficiently to stop the glass rattling. There is a slight possibility a big flood of water will get onto the reflector without a gasket.

Your problem appears to be the holding/adjusting screws, do you still have them in a serviceable condition. You can rob them from many old vehicles as the system is pretty common. I will wash my mouth out but a combination of self tapping screws in the old adjuster holes and a bed of Sikaflex or similar will hold the reflector on the tags until the dress ring is fitted.

As I said, I suspect it is a solid fit-up inside, so just screw reflector in with any eye-pleasing screw, and secure glass with the dress ring and aim by wrestling the whole unit after loosening its mudguard bolt/s.

You may not like the idea but a modern sealed or semi-sealed beam unit will just drop in but be so much easier and of course so much brighter. The older style have a domed front but modern ones will be fairly flat. You may have to find old car electric suppliers to get the original looking domed glass on a sealed or semi-sealed beam unit.

Lang

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Last edit: by Lang.

JXB HERCULES 19 Nov 2019 09:09 #204278

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If you have not seen something like this it maybe of benefit.
Cheers Steve
www.bearing.net.au/power-transmission/vee-belts-pulleys
The following user(s) said Thank You: cobbadog, Lang

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JXB HERCULES 19 Nov 2019 09:21 #204280

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  • If U don't like my Driving .... well then get off the footpath ...... LOL
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gr8 info BDuk
OF ALL THE THINGS EYE MISS ................. EYE MISS MY MIND THE MOST

There's more WORTH in KENWORTH

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JXB HERCULES 19 Nov 2019 12:08 #204285

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There are no screws or bezel in this particular light. The reflector and the lense are mounted inside the housing and about all I can remember are pushed forward against the light housing with springs and clips. I did pull them apart about 6 years ago but cant remember exactly. I was really hoping that someone might have an old book with the info in it. Thanks for the info page on belts, I'm also hoping that someone has a parts book for the herc engine which may contain the exact length I need

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