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4 months 2 weeks ago #250745 by fxs80
Looking for an ID was created by fxs80
Going through family pics & came across this, can someone identify vehicle & approx year 

1939 D2
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4 months 2 weeks ago #250746 by wouldyou
Replied by wouldyou on topic Looking for an ID
Model T Ford close to 1926 by the larger tyres.
David.
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4 months 2 weeks ago - 4 months 2 weeks ago #250747 by 180wannabe
Replied by 180wannabe on topic Looking for an ID
Ford Model T, but i'd suggest 1922.  1920-23 anyhow.

Brett.
Last edit: 4 months 2 weeks ago by 180wannabe. Reason: add detail
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4 months 2 weeks ago #250749 by Morris
Replied by Morris on topic Looking for an ID
I agree, Ford model T.  From the 1920s as it has the later pressed steel radiator surround which I think came in about 1919. The spare tyre appears to be a beaded-edge one which suggests early 1920's.  Production ceased in 1927.

In the 1980's I did win "Best performance in a veteran Car," in a "Round Victoria" rally driving a friend's 1912 Model T but I do not know much about the later ones.

I have my shoulder to the wheel,
my nose to the grindstone,
I've put my best foot forward,
I've put my back into it,
I'm gritting my teeth,

Now I find I can't do any work in this position!
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4 months 2 weeks ago - 4 months 2 weeks ago #250750 by Lang
Replied by Lang on topic Looking for an ID
Could be anywhere from 1917-25

Pre-17 had a square edge bonnet and 26/27 had more louvres.

All had 30x3 1/2  wheels which equals wheel diameter plus 2 times width of tyre. As the tyre aspect ratio in those days was close to 100% when you see that method of describing the wheels you just add twice the tyre size and take it away from the total. For Model T that would be 3 1/2 + 3 1/2 =7 take away from 30 to give you a 23 inch wheel. Works for just about any pre1930 car description American or British.

For 1926 they went over to 21 inch wheels and also offered wire wheels option.

Just like today you could buy bigger tyres but they are seldom seen in photos

Trucks had standard on front and bigger heavier wheels and tyres on the back though you do see photos of trucks with a little larger front tyre like mine below. 

Here is Bev driving 3 Model T's I have owned over the years. The first one is 1914 sportster with after market wire wheels. The Vintage T Racing rules prohibit wood wheels as, although they will carry greater loads than wires they do not stand side loads as well.

They are so light, nimble and nippy (for their time) it is easy to see why they were so popular. The winner was the flexible chassis with Ford special steel. In rough country they flexed amazingly and always kept their feet on the ground. Nearly all other cars with stiffer chassis would lift a wheel and lose traction. They even did great in the desert during WW1 not to mention the Australian outback.

Here a 100 year old unmodified Ford beats a tricked up suspension Modern Jeep Rockclimber
www.youtube.com/shorts/oNzdVngD_Pw?feature=share

They are also so easy to drive with the 3-pedal semi-automatic gearbox and no "clutch and gearstick". In sandy country you can go from high to low instantly without losing momentum like a clutch and stick car.



I built this one for my daughter's wedding. Unfortunately Gavan had not mastered the 3 pedal controls and it bolted on him going within inches of killing him and his bride of 30 minutes on the way to the reception.
 

Here is a photo of the Australian Light Horse. If you read about their story you will see these T model Fords were sent on hundreds of reconnaiscence patrols and had hair-raising adventures dicing with Turkish cavalry. The troops kept asking for more Model T's.

In this photo you can see a ring-in other make, what is it?
 

And the story of the worlds first successful automatic gearbox. Amazingly if you need new clutch plates just go to REPCO and ask for a set out of a GM Turbo 400 - they just drop straight in the 100 year old Ford box.

 
Last edit: 4 months 2 weeks ago by Lang.
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4 months 2 weeks ago - 4 months 2 weeks ago #250751 by Lang
Replied by Lang on topic Looking for an ID
Morris

The spare in the photo is just the standard detachable normal rim. They are a great idea, just 4 nuts on the dogs slide the old rim off, put the new one on and away you go.

Nothing new under the sun, just like modern truck spider wheels.

 

Model T certainly had clincher (or beaded edge) rims but they were not nearly as satisfactory as the split "well-type" moden style rim. Particularly if you drove them flat they would cut into the sidewall and were a pain in the a... to mount and unmount to repair a puncture. They also took 60-80psi where 40psi was fine for the straight side tyres. Dropping pressure in sand could be fatal to the bead-holding of clinchers and once they started flexing at the bead they would cut through.

Here is a Model T clincher. You can see how the rim curls around to grab the fat bead on the tyre instead of being straight like normal rims.The clinchers had direct bolt-on tags while the split detachables had the dogs.

 

See how the bead has popped out in this photo either from too low tyre pressure or hitting a big rock.

 
Last edit: 4 months 2 weeks ago by Lang.
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4 months 2 weeks ago #250753 by PaulFH
Replied by PaulFH on topic Looking for an ID
Centre one has sloping bonnet and more “bug eye” like headlight mounts. Wouldn’t know what make Lang.
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4 months 2 weeks ago - 4 months 2 weeks ago #250754 by Lang
Replied by Lang on topic Looking for an ID
Many of the great explorers trips involved Model T. Of course they were the car of choice for 75% of outback properties.

Here is Francis Birtles on an early cross Australia trip with an early brass radiator Model T (looks brand new).
 

And here is the unsung hero of  Australian exploration Michael Terry. This photo was taken on the first ever crossing of Northern Australia from Winton Qld to Derby WA
Notethey fitted the aftermarket solid wheels but kept the originals for their cut-down T trailer. He and his mate were within hours of dying of thirst before being found by a random boundary rider in the bush near Derby.
 
Last edit: 4 months 2 weeks ago by Lang.
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4 months 2 weeks ago #250755 by Lang
Replied by Lang on topic Looking for an ID
And finally this couple makes our Bean trip look like a wooses journey.

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4 months 2 weeks ago #250756 by wouldyou
Replied by wouldyou on topic Looking for an ID
Ford TT ready for the siding.

 


 
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